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Get A Rock Hard Anterior Core And Obliques With No Equipment

by Meghan Callaway

4 methods to get a strong core and obliques
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Equipment Not Necessary

When it comes to strengthening and developing the muscles of the anterior core and obliques, you do not need a lot of equipment. What you need is a good understanding of the human body and how it is designed to function, and some creativity. Using a wall is a fantastic way to make regular exercises even more challenging and effective.

Here are 4 of my favorite exercises that require minimal equipment, and a wall.

1
Feet Elevated RKC Plank With Opposite Shoulder Touches

Coaching cue’s

  • This exercise strengthens the muscles of the anterior core and trains the body to resist the extension and rotation of the spine.
  • Get into a plank position on your hands and toes, and elevate your feet up a wall. Unlike during the regular RKC plank, your hands should be well ahead of your shoulders and you will use your hands to drive your body into the wall as this will prevent your feet from sliding down the wall, and will help you generate even more full body tension.
  • Set your body so it is in a straight line from your head to heels, and tuck your chin. Your head, torso and hips should be in a stacked position.
  • Aim to keep your feet hip to shoulder width apart. If you find that you are struggling, adopt a slightly wider distance between your feet, as this wider base will provide you with additional stability.
  • Take a deep breath in through your nose (360 degrees of air around your spine), contract all of your core muscles and legs as hard as you can, tuck your ribcage down towards your hips (close the space in your midsection), and squeeze your glutes.
  • Now lift your hand and touch your opposite shoulder. Lower and repeat with the opposite hand.
  • For the duration of the exercise, your head, torso and hips should remain in a stacked position. Do not allow your lower back to hyperextend, ribcage to flare, hips to collapse or pike, or neck to collapse.

Regression: 

Make this exercise easier by placing your feet on the floor, or by elevating your forearms on a bench.

Progression: 

Make this exercise more challenging by adding resistance.

Prescription:

Do 3 sets of 5-10 knee tucks per side.

2
Feet Elevated RKC Plank With Knee Tucks

 

This exercise strengthens the muscles of the anterior core and trains the body to resist the extension, lateral flexion, and rotation of the spine.

Coaching cue’s

  • Get into a plank position on your hands and toes, and elevate your feet up a wall. Unlike during the regular RKC plank, your hands should be well ahead of your shoulders, and you will use your hands to drive your body into the wall as this will prevent your feet from sliding down the wall, and will help you generate even more full body tension.
  • Set your body so it is in a straight line from your head to heels, and tuck your chin. Your head, torso and hips should be in a stacked position.
  • Aim to keep your feet hip to shoulder width apart. If you find that you are struggling, adopt a slightly wider distance between your feet, as this wider base will provide you with additional stability.
  • Take a deep breath in through your nose (360 degrees of air around your spine), contract all of your core muscles and legs as hard as you can, tuck your ribcage down towards your hips (close the space in your midsection), and squeeze your glutes.
  • Now perform a knee tuck and slowly bring your knee in towards your chest. Repeat with the opposite leg.
  • Keep your moving leg relaxed so it doesn’t dominate the movement.
  • For the duration of the exercise, your head, torso and hips should remain in a stacked position. Do not allow your lower back to hyperextend, ribcage to flare, hips to collapse or pike, or neck to collapse.

Regression:

Make this exercise easier by placing your feet on the floor, or by elevating your forearms on a bench.

Progression:

Make this exercise more challenging by adding resistance.

 

Prescription:

Do 3 sets of 5-10 knee tucks per side.

3
RKC Plank Wall Climbs

This exercise strengthens the muscles of the anterior core and trains the body to resist the extension and rotation of the spine.

Coaching Cues:

 

  • Get into a plank position on your hands and toes, and set yourself up so you are facing a wall and are a few inches away. Set your body so it is in a straight line from your head to heels, and tuck your chin. Your head, torso and hips should be in a stacked position.
  • Aim to keep your feet hip to shoulder width apart. If you find that you are struggling, adopt a slightly wider distance between your feet, as this wider base will provide you with additional stability.
  • Take a deep breath in through your nose (360 degrees of air around your spine), contract all of your core muscles and legs as hard as you can, tuck your rib cage down towards your hips (close the space in your midsection), and squeeze your glutes.
  • Now climb up the wall with either hand. Lower to the floor, and repeat.
  • As for your breathing, hold your breath for the duration of the rep, and exhale/re-inhale before the next rep.
  • Your head, torso and hips should remain in a stacked position for the duration of the exercise. Do not allow your lower back to hyperextend, ribcage to flare, hips to collapse or pike, or neck to collapse.

 

Regression:

Make this exercise easier by performing the regular RKC plank variation.

Progression:

Make this exercise more challenging by performing more reps.

Prescription:

Do 3 sets of 5-10 reps (each rep = 1 climb per arm)

4
Feet Elevated RKC Side Plank + Bottoms Up Kettlebell Hold and Leg Abduction

This advanced RKC side plank variation strengthens the muscles of the anterior core and obliques, trains the body to resist the extension and lateral flexion of the spine, and develops shoulder and scapular stability. Unlike the regular RKC side plank variation, you will elevate your feet up a wall, will perform a bottoms-up kettlebell hold, and leg abductions.

Coaching Cues:

  • Get into a side plank position on your hand and toes. Your hand should be well ahead of your shoulder, and you will use your hand to drive your body into the wall as this will prevent your feet from sliding down the wall, and will help you generate even more full body tension.​
  • Set your body so it is in a straight line from your head to heels, and tuck your chin. Your head, torso and hips should be in a stacked position.
  • Take a deep breath in through your nose (360 degrees of air around your spine), contract all of your core muscles and legs as hard as you can, and tuck your ribcage down towards your hips.
  • Press the kettlebell so it is in the bottoms-up position. Your hand, elbow and shoulder should be in a straight line. Keep the muscles in your shoulder, mid and upper back, arm, and forearm engaged, and your wrist in a vertical position. This will be very challenging.
  • Hold this position for 10-20 seconds and perform leg abductions with your bottom leg.This should amount to 5-10 abductions.
  • As for your breathing, for the duration of the exercise, breathe in through your nose, and slowly exhale through your teeth.
  • For the duration of the exercise, your head, torso and hips should remain in a stacked position. Do not allow your lower back to hyperextend, ribcage to flare or rotate, hips to collapse, rotate or pike, or neck to collapse.

Progression

Make this exercise easier by decreasing the amount of time you hold, or by performing the regular feet elevated RKC side plank variation.

Progression:

Make this exercise more challenging by increasing the weight of the kettlebell, or by increasing the amount of time you hold.

Prescription:

Do 2-3 sets of 5-10 abductions per side.

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Summary

While all of these exercises address lumbo-pelvic stability and shoulder/scapular stability, they will also have a positive carryover to your ability to perform pull-ups as the pull-up is a full body exercise that requires a significant amount of lumbo-pelvic stability and shoulder/scapular stability.

If you want quick concise effective gains and no bullshit training check out Meghans Ultimate Pull-Up Program by clicking the link below:

www.ultimatepullups.com

Meghan Callaway Unconventional Athletes

Meghan Callaway

Nationality: Canadian

Meghan Callaway is prominent personal trainer in Vancouver, Canada with over 15 years of training experience. Meghan currently works with a wide array of clients, ranging from the elite athlete, to post-physical therapy rehabilitation and strength training, and many average fitness clients who are looking to feel and function better than they ever have.

When it comes to her training, Meghan has a three-pronged approach. The first prong is soccer specific conditioning, the second prong is traditional strength training, and the third prong, and a huge part of her training, is unconventional training. Meghan enjoys pushing her body to its limits and never stops trying to meet new challenges.

Meghan has played competitive soccer for 27 years, and when she was younger, also competed as a multi-sport in ice hockey and baseball before she turned her full attention to soccer. Meghan also competed in high school basketball, volleyball, and field hockey.

A huge turning point in Meghan’s life occurred when she was 26 years old, and was in a very bad car accident. While she was extremely lucky and walked away without an injury, this car accident started a chain reaction of full body issues, injuries and dysfunctions that eventually forced Meghan to stop playing soccer as the pain and frustration was debilitating. Over the course of five years, Meghan spent over $20,000 going from doctor to doctor, trying to find somebody who could actually figure out what was causing her many issues. It took over five years, but it was eventually determined that all of her issues (joint, nerve, muscular) were being caused by severely misaligned ribs that occurred in the car accident. Once Meghan knew what she was dealing with, she devoted her time and energy to rebuilding her body and fitness level.

Just under two years ago, Meghan made her comeback to soccer as she was confident that due to the three-pronged training approach that she follows meticulously, her body was healthy and strong enough that she could enjoy the game, and play at a high level. Meghan’s team capped off their past season by winning the Canadian national championships, and they have a very good chance of repeating this season.

Meghan Callaway Social Media:

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